The Grass is Singing by Doris Lessing May22

The Grass is Singing by Doris Lessing...

The Grass is Singing The incident on p.41 (Chapter 2) is of great interest to a reader. Mary overhears the other women talking and she is upset for sure; but it is far more than that: she is destroyed, literally, because the image she had lived to up until then was no longer of use to her: “Mary’s idea of herself was destroyed and she was not fitted to recreate herself.” (43) Her marriage to Dick is the only way she knows to ┬álimit the damage, to conform to something, anything, rather than feeling utterly dissolved. Compare this to Erica and Tessa in the other texts. How do the other two women look when put beside Mary? Dick has a deep, ingrained hatred for urbanity: on p. 45 we see how “he wanted to murder” when he imagined the lives of suburbanites. This is similar, though not identical, to the third world sensibility we learn about in Mohsin. He has unusual impulses and instincts, hating the cinema and finding the pretty actresses he saw there boring (45). In Mohsin Changez finds Erica’s nakedness something of a revelation. Changez, a bit like Mary Turner, doesn’t really know himself. He doesn’t know how to respond to seeing uncovered breasts; Mary “knew so little about herself that she was thrown completely off her balance [by gossip].” (44) Also, like Changez, Mary doesn’t know what she wants: “it was impossible to fit together what she wanted for herself, and what she was offered.” She is scared of men, loathes them even, and yet she goes out with them to the movies more and more often. It was a feeling of superiority over men that was driving her; Dick allowed to feel superior. This is very different to Justin...