Nineteen-Eighty-Four by Cormac Larkin: Dilworth Non-Fiction Runner-up May23

Nineteen-Eighty-Four by Cormac Larkin: Dilworth Non-Fiction Runner-up...

Orwell’s attention to detail The attention to detail in this novel is nothing short of astonishing. In this novel, Orwell “invents” a whole new type of society, a society held together not by love, but by hate. Not only that, but he also invents a new language, “Newspeak”, which has given us new words such as the concept of “Doublethink”, which will be discussed later, and “Big Brother”, which has even spawned a reality TV show. Finally, he also has a second sub-book in the novel, The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism, the book given to Winston by “The Brotherhood” that was supposedly written by Emmanuel Goldstein. This shows how Orwell portrays Oceania in a very elaborate way. The depth and realism in the novel The depth and realism in this novel is another reason why I thoroughly enjoyed it. Orwell manages to depict Oceania and in particular Oceanic society in a particularly vivid manner. He tells us that, during the Two Minutes Hate, people would shout, scream and even throw projectiles at the telescreen that was showing the programme. He also goes to great pains to explain the significance of a look he received from an inner party member called O’Brien, who we will examine later. Also, the level of realism is extreme. When Winston goes into a pub to question an elderly prole he observes an old man asking for a pint only to be told that the only measurements used were the metric litre and half litre. It is nuggets like this that make good books great books, and is one of the reasons it is my personal favourite. The complex character of O’Brien In this novel, one of the most fascinating aspects is the way Orwell shrouds an explicit...